Data of 6 Million Battle for the Galaxy Players Leaked

 

WizCase security experts recently uncovered an unsecured ElasticSearch server owned by AMT Games, a Chinese mobile and browser game company, that exposed 5.9 million Battle for the Galaxy users' accounts, as well as 2 million transactions and 587,000 feedback messages. 

Despite the fact that AMT Games used the server to store profile information, payment history, and feedback messages for millions of Battle for the Galaxy players, the researchers discovered that data stored in the ElasticSearch server was not encrypted and the server was not secured with a password. 

AMT Games, which has a slew of mobile and social games with tens of millions of downloads, exposed 1.5TB of data through an Elasticsearch server. AMT Games Ltd. is a renowned mobile and browser-based online game company based in China. It creates games for Android, iPhone, Steam, and web browsers. Battle for the Galaxy, Heroes of War: WW2 Idle RPG, Epic War TD2, and Trench Assault are among of the company's most popular games. 

Player IDs, usernames, country, total money spent on the game, and data from Facebook, Apple, or Google accounts if the user linked them to their gaming account are often included in profiles. Account IDs, feedback ratings, and users' email addresses are all included in feedback messages. 

According to WizCase, transaction data includes price, item purchased, time of purchase, payment provider, and occasionally buyer IP addresses. Users who had their data exposed were advised that it could have been snatched up by opportunistic cyber-criminals looking for misconfigured databases. It went on to say that information on how much money people have spent on the site might help fraudsters target the biggest spenders. 

WizCase warned that "it is common for unethical hackers and criminals on the internet to use personal data to create trustworthy phishing emails. The more information they possess, the more believable these emails look." Bad actors could utilize personal information like email addresses and user difficulties with the service to "pose as game support and send users to fraudulent websites where their credit card credentials can be stolen," according to the report. 

The company advised players to enter as little personal information as possible when purchasing or setting up an account, and parents not to lend their credit cards to their children. WizCase stated that it notified AMT Games of the data breach but received no response. Access to the database was later disabled by the company.