HP Enterprise Suffers Critical Bug, Requests Users To Update

 

Experts had already alarmed that HPE's (Hewlett Packard Enterprise) unpatched Edgeline Infrastructure Manager versions were vulnerable to remote authentication bypass breach. HP is requesting its customers to patch one of the company's top-class application management software that lets hackers launch a remote authentication bypass attack and gain access to customer's cloud infrastructure. The bug with a CVSS score of 9.8, is rated critical. It impacts all variants of HPE's EIM (Edgeline Infrastructure Manager) ahead of variant 1.21. 

The edge computing management suite of HPE, EIM is two years old. Users are advised to immediately install HPE EIM AV1.22 or later updates for bug fixes. In a security bulletin posted recently, HPE Product Security Response Team wrote, “a security vulnerability has been identified in the HPE Edgeline Infrastructure Manager, also known as HPE Edgeline Infrastructure Management Software. The vulnerability could be remotely exploited to bypass remote authentication leading to the execution of arbitrary commands, gaining privileged access, causing a denial of service, and changing the configuration." 

About the bug 

Remote authentication-bypass vulnerability is related to a problem linked to how HPE manages reset passwords for admin accounts. If a user logs in for the first time with a default password for an active administrator account, he is asked to change the password for the account. It is carried out by sending a request to URL redfish/v1/SessionService/ResetPassword/1. But, when the password is changed, a malicious remote hacker can exploit the same URL to change the password for an administrator account. Next, the hacker has to simply log in with the updated admin account password by sending a request to a URL. 

After that, hackers can change the password of the OS root account by sending a request to URL /redfish/v1/AccountService/Accounts/1. "It allows the attacker to SSH to the EIM host as root. SSH stands for Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell and is a network protocol that is most often used by system administrators for remote command-line requests, system logins, and also for remote command execution," reports threat post. Cybersecurity firm Tenable has also uploaded proof of the attack.