Fraudsters Target US Tax Experts in Ongoing Phishing Campaign

 

Scammers are targeting US tax professionals in ongoing series of phishing attacks to steal Electronic Filling identification Numbers (EFINs). The International Revenue Service (IRS) has alerted US tax experts regarding the phishing campaign and suggested taking precautionary measures to avoid any loss.

The ongoing series of phishing attacks was started right before the US tax season with the target of stealing both users’ data and tax professionals’ identity. Scammers trick tax preparers by sending phishing emails and asking them to email their copies of “EFIN (e-file identification number) verification and Driver’s license” as a part of the fake verification process.

To make the verification process more authentic scammers threaten the potential victims to freeze their accounts they use to file tax documents online. Due to lack of knowledge or fear the victims hand over their information to the scammers. Once the scammers receive the information, they can file tax returns illegally for refunds by acting as tax professionals. 

IRS Tax E-Filling’ is used as the sender name by scammers in emails and ‘Verifying your EFIN before e-filing as a subject line followed by the content mentioned below:
“In order to help protect both you and your clients from unauthorized/fraudulent activities, the IRS requires that you verify all authorized e-file originators prior to transmitting returns through our system. That means we need your EFIN (e-file identification number) verification and Driver’s license before you e-file."

“Please have a current PDF copy or image of your EFIN acceptance letter (5880C Letter dated within the last 12 months) or a copy of your IRS EFIN Application Summary, found at your e-Services account at IRS.gov, and Front and Back of Driver’s License emailed to complete the verification process. If your EFIN is not verified by our system, your ability to e-file will be disabled until you provide documentation showing your credentials are in good standing to e-file with the IRS.”

Tax experts targeted by this ongoing phishing campaign are recommended not to respond to suspicious emails and to send the emails (as file attachments) to phishing@irs.gov. Tax professionals can also report to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration for further analysis by the IRS Criminal Investigation division.