Developer of Cyberpunk 2077 Hit by Ransomware Attack

 

Ransomware turned into an inexorably critical danger all through 2020, as hackers continued to target hospitals and health care providers amid pandemic. A more modest pattern has additionally been brewing in the course of the most recent couple of months, with a rash of assaults on computer game organizations including big names like Ubisoft, Capcom, and Crytek. Presently the developer CD Projekt Red, which released the censured blockbuster Cyberpunk 2077 in December, is the most recent target. 

On Tuesday, CD Projekt Red uncovered that it had been the victim of a ransomware assault. “Some of our internal systems have been compromised,” the organization said in a statement presented on Twitter. The assailants encrypted a few PCs and took the information, however CD Projekt Red said it would not pay the ransom and that it was re-establishing its systems from backups. The incident comes as CD Projekt Red faced a long time of sustained criticism for its bug-ridden, overhyped Cyberpunk 2077 release. The game had numerous performance issues on various platforms, that is why Sony pulled it from the PlayStation Store and, alongside Microsoft, offered refunds to players. 

Despite the organization's recuperation efforts, it still faces potential fallout. The assailants obviously took source code for Cyberpunk 2077 as well as other CD Projekt Red games like Witcher 3, an unreleased version of Witcher 3, and Gwent, the digital Witcher card game. The assailants likewise say they took business data like investor relations, human resources, and accounting data. CD Projekt Red says there is no proof that client information was undermined in the breach.

“If we will not come to an agreement, then your source code will be sold or leaked online and your documents will be sent to our contacts in gaming journalism,” the attackers said in their ransom note. 

CD Projekt Red has released patches for Cyberpunk 2077 trying to improve the game's stability and do damage control. Yet, the organization faces a lawsuit from investors, accusing that it forced developers to work unreasonably overtime to finish the game, and criticism about its use of nondisclosure agreements to keep journalists from reporting accurately on the game's shortcomings prior to release.